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Adjectives ending in -ly

Usually we think that words ending in -ly are adverbs. But not all -ly words are adverbs. There are some adjectives that end in -ly. Here is a complete list below. Since these words are adjectives, they cannot be used like other adverbs. For example – Incorrect: He behaves friendly. Correct: He behaves in a friendly manner. Some of these words can be used as adjectives or adverbs. Adverb: He came early Adjective: You are early today. SL Adjectives endinf in -ly 1.      beastly Continue reading →Usually we think that words ending in -ly are adverbs. But not all -ly words are adverbs. There are some adjectives that end in -ly. Here is a complete list below. Since these words are adjectives, they cannot be used like other adverbs. For example - Incorrect: He behaves friendly. Correct: He behaves in a friendly manner. Some of these words can be used as adjectives or adverbs. Adverb: He came early Adjective: You are early today. SL Adjectives endinf in -ly 1.      beastly Continue reading →

Adverbs without – LY

We are used to looking at adverbs as words ending in – LY. But there are some adverbs (without – LY looking alike adjectives. Here are some examples of such confusing adverbs: 1. I clean forgot the matter. Here clean is not the word you are accustomed to using.. It means something different. It means COMPLETELY. 2. I’m dead certain I left my purse on the desk.   Here Dead means Completely. Please that DEADLY is an adjective which means fatal: a deadly virus 3. Does Continue reading →We are used to looking at adverbs as words ending in - LY. But there are some adverbs (without - LY looking alike adjectives. Here are some examples of such confusing adverbs: 1. I clean forgot the matter. Here clean is not the word you are accustomed to using.. It means something different. It means COMPLETELY. 2. I'm dead certain I left my purse on the desk.   Here Dead means Completely. Please that DEADLY is an adjective which means fatal: a deadly virus 3. Does Continue reading →

Question 001: Why is ‘to’ not used before ‘home’?

Answer 001: Before answering the the question, let us talk about how adverbs are used after verbs. In British English, adverbs are used independently after verbs without the help of prepositions. For example, Come here. Come to school. In the first example, ‘here’ is an adverb. So, no preposition is used after the verb ‘come’. But in the second example, since school is not an adverb, preposition ‘to’ is used after the verb. When intransitive verbs are extended, we need either an adverb or a Continue reading →Answer 001: Before answering the the question, let us talk about how adverbs are used after verbs. In British English, adverbs are used independently after verbs without the help of prepositions. For example, Come here. Come to school. In the first example, 'here' is an adverb. So, no preposition is used after the verb 'come'. But in the second example, since school is not an adverb, preposition 'to' is used after the verb. When intransitive verbs are extended, we need either an adverb or a Continue reading →